Tag Archives: Ultrasound

Visions of Burma – supporting training in Yangon

DCIM103GOPROGOPR4071.JPG

Outreach team (from left to right: Franti Grochal from Slovakia, Dr. Philippe Jeanty from USA, Ya Chiao Hu from Taiwan and Federico Badano from Argentina).
Image courtesy of Dr. Philippe Jeanty of TheFetus.Net

On 7 March 2017, Outreach Committee Member and Founder of TheFetus.net Dr. Philippe Jeanty (USA), led a group of trainers in Yangon, Myanmar to train 30 trainees from across the country in basic OB/GYN ultrasound. ISUOG Outreach supported this mission and below, Dr. Jeanty provides his first impressions of Yangon from early this week.

“First day:

This is the first Outreach course we’de done in Yangon, Myanmar. The first day was rest and recovery from very long trips! Federico Badano was the longest distance flyer (29 hours from Argentina), followed by Franti Grochal (26 hours from Slovakia). Ya Chiao Hu from Taiwan and Gwang Jun Kim from South Korea had an easier time but still pretty long trips!
We did some light visiting, taking a local train to site see. Interestingly, we crossed the tracks a few time to get from platform to platform. Very surprising to me!  The train was full of colorful people. They use some ground up stone for makeup and sunscreen. In the train there was a panel with 3 warnings: you can’t smoke or litter, but more surprisingly, you cannot kiss on the train!

DCIM103GOPROGOPR4100.JPG

Yangon train
Image courtesy of Dr. Philippe Jeanty of TheFetus.Net

The train was really packed and vendors circulating with all types of food, drinks and trinkets. They even sell betel leaves that people keep in their checks, a little like the coca leaves in the Andes with similar bad effects on teeth! We chatted with some people who were very friendly and quite interested in us. Actually mostly interested in Ya Chiao and we learned later that Korean movies are very popular here and they thought she was a Korean actress!!
We visited a pagoda with an immense Buddha statue made of a single block of marble imported (if I am correct)  from Nepal.
The food is very varied and influenced by Chinese and Indian cuisine.
Today was the first day of the course and we met with our local contact, Dr Yin Yin Soe, who organized the course.
We had 30 students and they come from all over Myanmar! It was incredible that many had come from hospitals with only one obstetrician so it was apparently difficult to get government permission for them to attend the course and have surgeon cover their absence. Many travelled by train the night before. Compared to previous Outreach courses, they are much less intimidated which makes the contact easier.
We had class room in the morning and workshop the afternoon.
It is very very hot! 37 C/99 F, but the students were really eager to learn!

Second day:

Ya Chiao scanning

Yao Chiao scanning with a trainee
Image courtesy of Dr. Philippe Jeanty of TheFetus.net

Since I am so hard at hearing, I got in the habit of asking people to write their questions on paper and drop them on the desk. This is also a great technique for shy students and women who otherwise would not ask questions. Well, we were inundated and the questions reflected a very good level of knowledge. This is an interesting situation with knowledgeable students who just have very little hand-on practice. So I worry that our lectures were too basic.
For Ya Chiao, this was her very first ever presentation in front of a class and even behind her impassible stoic face, she was clearly nervous! Sonographers don’t often teach physicians in Asia but she did a very good job!
Gwang Jun had the second presentation and talked about CNS anatomy and the views. As expected, he had a great presentation and has a unique style of teaching, for instance a way to remember the ventricular system by folding the fingers was a refreshing approach to the usual topic!
Federico and Franti then did their presentation with the ease of someone who has spent years doing them.

Group photo

Trainers with trainees
Image courtesy of Dr. Philippe Jeanty of TheFetus.net

The afternoon we had tons of patients with anomalies, including large cephalocele, missed AB, triplets and so on. Some patients needed TV examination which we rarely do in courses like this and Concordia rapidly got us a TV probe and we did several scans. It helps that women here are accepting and that almost all the students are women.
They know what they need to look for but needed help in coordinating what they see on screen with the movement of the transducer. So I hold their hand and show the movement. And invariably they look at my hand moving theirs instead of looking at the screen! So finally I took a patient chart as a “blind” to force them to just look at the screen!
The machines we have are uneven resolution. The three top end machines are fantastic but the low end one makes you realize what it is to scan in a country that has a hard time affording to machines: we are very spoiled!”

Stay tuned for more stories from Myanmar and next week, as we report from Ghana!

 

DCIM104GOPROG1094768.JPG

Outreach team (from left to right: Franti Grochal from Slovakia, Dr. Philippe Jeanty from USA, Federico Badano from Argentina, Ya Chiao Hu from Taiwan and Dr. Gwang Jun Kim from South Korea)
Image courtesy of Dr. Philippe Jeanty of TheFetus.net

Advertisements

ISUOG returns to Ghana!

Ghana7

Women in waiting – Kumasi, Ghana 2015
Photo by G.A Baez for ISUOG Outreach

 

Following a successful Outreach Program back in November 2015, the ISUOG Outreach team is returning to Kumasi, Ghana for Phase II Trip II on 13 March 2017! Led by Outreach Chair and Project Lead Dr. Anthony Johnson (USA), the team will consist of Dr. Janet Horenstein (USA) and Dr. Theodora Pepera-Hibbert (UK/Ghana) once more. ISUOG’s International Development Coordinator, Mr. Gesu Antonio Baez, will also be joining the team in Kumasi. ISUOG Outreach is proud to be working with local NGO partner Women’s Health to Wealth (WHW) in supporting the team and program mission, as well as GE Healthcare who previously donated 3 Voluson machines for this project. The team is looking forward to getting back on the ground and help the trainees hone in on their skills and build their confidence to train locally in line with ISUOG’s “Teaching the Teacher’s” concept. For more information on our work in Ghana, visit our website for more details.

Stay tuned for more stories from the field as they happen – subscribe to our quarterly newsletter!

Impressions from a first time volunteer in Papua New Guinea

png-1

ISUOG  Outreach volunteer Alice Robinson (far right) in Papua New Guinea with one of the trainees (Image courtesy of Nayana Parange)

 

ISUOG Outreach and the Australasian Society of Ultrasound in Medicine (ASUM) conducted an Outreach mission in Port Morsby, Papua New Guinea in October 2016. As a first time volunteer for ISUOG Outreach and ASUM, Alice Robinson of Australia explains her experience in empowering other practitioners with ultrasound.

Flying into Port Moresby Airport, I found a hive of activity; many of the travellers were expats arriving back to Papua New Guinea (PNG) for a variety of reasons – leading fishing charters, managing a food distribution company, working in a local school, whilst others were visiting PNG for tourism, which extends to bird watching in the highlands and walking the Kokoda track. Brief interactions with these fellow travellers made me think I had underestimated the resources available to this small country, which lies just a hop, skip and jump from the northern tip of my own home country, Australia (150km to be more precise).

Papua New Guinea has a maternal mortality rate of 250 per 100,000, one of the highest in the Western Pacific region, and a high fertility rate of 3.8 births per woman, which is double that of Australia’s fertility rate. The role of ultrasound in the overall care of women and children in PNG needs to be put in the context of these staggering figures, and is certainly vastly different from the role of ultrasound in Australian medical practice.

Spending five days at Port Moresby General Hospital and teaching ultrasound to a dedicated group who had traveled far to attend the course made me realise I had overestimated the resources allocated to maternal health and safety. The doctors, midwives, and supporting healthcare staff who we had the privilege of meeting during the program provide an amazing service to the women of PNG despite limited supplies and challenging circumstances.

With all this in mind, my three colleagues and I (brought together by the Australian Society of Ultrasound in Medicine – ASUM – Outreach Committee), tailored a basic OB/GYN ultrasound course for the nine rural healthcare professionals we trained. Despite the four tutors originating from Australia, we come from different corners of the country and gained our medical, ultrasound, and teaching skills via varied pathways. It was such a pleasure to work with like-minded professionals who brought very different attributes and skills to the course, such as Nayana Parange (PNG Project leader) who’s prior experiences in PNG were particularly beneficial in understanding the local healthcare system and how our course could be most beneficial.

As we took the trainees through tutorials (two or three per day) and practical sessions (three-four hours per day), it became apparent that their enthusiasm and hunger for knowledge was not only due to their impending exams (to achieve a Diploma in Gynecology and Obstetrics), but also due to the direct applicability of new ultrasound skills to each of their clinical practices. The small group practical sessions were a highlight, with two to three trainees per tutor, and a long line of patients from the outpatient clinics and inpatient wards at the hospital. This gave us the opportunity not only to meet some delightful local women, but to see each of the trainees improve individually over the next four days.

The many stories that were told over the course of the program highlighted that ultrasound will be another useful tool at the disposal of these talented doctors. A perfect example is one participant who had recently undertaken carpentry and plumbing training, skills which seemed as vital as any medical technology in keeping his remote health centre running smoothly.

Looking to the future, we hope that this brief training course will give participants the ultrasound skills to save lives and improve management in women’s health. This will require ongoing support and feedback for the trainees, which we are planning to provide with online discussions, and refresher courses during subsequent visits.

I feel privileged to have been involved in the first joint ASUM/ISUOG ultrasound training course in PNG. The involvement of both organisations ensured a structured approach and collaboration between all parties to achieve a common goal. Our glimpse into PNG life was very educational, and I hope we were able to teach the trainees as much about ultrasound as they taught us about overcoming the difficulties of working in the country’s rural areas.

Alice Robinson
Australia

 

png-3

Patients in waiting, Port Morsby – PNG (Image courtesy of Nayana Parange)