WHO Meeting in London: maternal health in the post-2015 agenda

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ISUOG participated as an active observer during the WHO-PMNCH Board meeting in London, chaired by Graça Machel, former First Lady of South Africa and Mozambique.

As a member of WHO’s Partnership for Maternal and Newborn Child Health, ISUOG participated in their Annual Board Meeting on Monday 20 April 2015, at the RCOG headquarters in London.

Chaired by former South Africa/Mozambique First Lady, Graça Machel (who is also the widow of Nelson Mandela) the energy in the room was electric with discussions on strategies to improve women’s health and focused on identifying priorities for maternal and child health for the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda. However, identifying these priorities became a real challenge for the board which tried to agree on what these should be and at the same time recognise the needs of all nations. This stems from the common issue of data and feedback monitoring which proved to be inconsistent over the years and there is now a lack of concrete and inconsistent reporting on what the main issues are in various countries.

ISUOG is a proud to partner with PMNCH and our presence at this meeting helped address the importance of providing doctors with quality education and training so that they can deliver effective obstetric and gynecological care to women all over the world.

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Amina Mahamad of Nigeria, UN’s Advisor to Maternal and Child Health for the Post-2015 agenda, responds to why educating doctors is crucial in saving the lives of countless women.

Highlighting the importance of ensuring all OB/GYN’s are empowered with quality education in training, Amina Mahamad of Nigeria, who serves as the UN’s Advisor to Maternal and Child Health for the Post-2015 agenda, shared her own experience as a mother. When giving birth to her four children in Nigeria, she was found subject to squalid conditions and dealt with doctors who were not sure exactly how to manage the childbirth. She highlighted that it is indeed time for countries to invest in education and resources for their health practitioners to help prevent maternal mortality. She mentioned as well her own cousin, who died of pre-eclampsia, which was not diagnosed until it was too late, despite having been to all her routine check-ups. Her message was clear; all mothers should be given the assurance and ease of mind that their doctor is fully capable of delivering their baby safely and this only comes through quality education for our doctors.

The agenda for the Sustainable Development goals aim to incorporate the needs of both the developing and developed world; and, it is clear that many more conversations will be needed to ensure that the goals fulfil the health requirements of women and children globally. ISUOG is very proud to be part of this process and looks forward to progress in the years to come.

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